Early Voting on the Increase in US 

More than 35 million Americans have already cast their ballots in congressional races across the country ahead of Tuesday’s midterm elections, as key Republicans predicted Sunday that they will take control of both houses of Congress from Democrats in the second half of Democratic President Joe Biden’s four-year term in the White House.

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The early voting trend continues, with the United States Elections Project saying that the total number of pre-voting days this year has been surpassed by the 2014 and 2018 congressional elections that took place in the middle of Barack Obama’s presidential terms. and Donald Trump.

A senior voter uses her own magnifying glass while casting her ballot at a participating Flex Voting Center at the offices of the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights, CHIRLA, in Los Angeles, Nov.  5, 2022.

A senior voter uses her own magnifying glass while casting her ballot at a participating Flex Voting Center at the offices of the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights, CHIRLA, in Los Angeles, Nov. 5, 2022.

Voting rules were changed in many states ahead of the 2020 presidential election when Biden defeated Trump to ease the way for early voting to ease the fears of many voters who are afraid to vote in person at polling stations during the rush hour. of the coronavirus pandemic.

Today, many voters are accustomed to voting before Election Day, particularly Democrats. Meanwhile, Trump, who has repeatedly signaled that he is close to announcing a 2024 presidential campaign, and several other Republicans who have repeatedly attacked early voting, claim without evidence that it promotes of fraud.

All 435 seats in the House of Representatives and 35 of the 100 seats in the Senate are contested. Democrats have held minimal control of both chambers since early 2021, allowing Biden to advance some of his legislative priorities, often over the nearly concerted opposition of Republican lawmakers.

On CNN’s “State of the Union” show Sunday, Ronna McDaniel, the Republican national chair, declared, “I think we’re going to take back the House and the Senate.”

The Senate is now split 50-50 between Republicans and Democrats, with Vice President Kamala Harris giving Democrats a tie in the votes.

Senator Rick Scott of Florida, who is leading the Republican campaign’s effort to win a majority for his party, predicted on NBC’s “Meet the Press” show that Republicans would pick up at least two seats to gain majority in the Senate that will sit in January.

“I see a good night for Republicans,” predicted Marc Short, former chief of staff to Vice President Mike Pence, on CNN.

Democrats are watching the outcome of Tuesday’s elections cautiously, with Democratic strategist Hilary Rosen telling CNN, “We didn’t listen to the voters in this election.” He also said that neither Democratic candidate has focused enough on raising the cost of living, which a large majority of voters say is their biggest concern, not that Republican candidates still reject the legitimacy of Biden’s victory over Trump in 2020, as many Republicans contend.

However, New York Congressman Sean Patrick Maloney, the chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, himself facing a difficult re-election contest, expressed confidence in the ability of the Democrats to hold control of the House.

“We’re going to handle this crowd,” he told NBC.

Currently, CNN predicts that Republicans lead in 216 House elections, just short of the 218 needed for a majority in the 435-member chamber, and Democrats hold the edge in 199 races, with 20 seats too close to the project.

CNN says eight competitive Senate races will determine control of the upper house in Congress.

A prominent US political polling site, fivethirtyeight.com, now gives Republicans a 55% chance of winning the Senate and an 84% chance of wresting Democratic control of the House.

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