Latest news on Russia and the war in Ukraine

Two Ukrainian soldiers, injured by Russian mines, receive prosthetics in Brooklyn, New York

Ukrainian soldiers Anton Domaratskyi (2nd R) and Victor Nesterenkoi (2nd L), brought to New York by the nonprofit organization Kind Deeds, receive prosthetics at an orthopedic clinic in the city of Brooklyn, New York .

Ukrainian soldiers Anton Domaratskyi (R) and Victor Nesterenkoi (L), brought to New York by the nonprofit organization Kind Deeds, receive prosthetics at an orthopedic clinic in the city of Brooklyn, New York, United States on October 27, 2022.

Eren Abdullahogullari | Anadolu Agency | Getty Images

Ukrainian soldiers Anton Domaratskyi (not seen) and Victor Nesterenkoi (L), brought to New York by the nonprofit organization Kind Deeds, receive prosthetics at an orthopedic clinic in the city of Brooklyn, New York, United States on October 27, 2022.

Eren Abdullahogullari | Anadolu Agency | Getty Images

Ukrainian soldiers Anton Domaratskyi (R) and Victor Nesterenkoi (L), brought to New York by the nonprofit organization Kind Deeds, receive prosthetics at an orthopedic clinic in the city of Brooklyn, New York, United States on October 27, 2022.

Eren Abdullahogullari | Anadolu Agency | Getty Images

Ukrainian soldiers Anton Domaratskyi and Victor Nesterenkoi, brought to New York by the nonprofit organization Kind Deeds, receive prosthetics at an orthopedic clinic in the city of Brooklyn, New York, United States on October 27, 2022 .

Eren Abdullahogullari | Anadolu Agency | Getty Images

Ukrainian soldiers Anton Domaratskyi (2nd R) and Victor Nesterenkoi (2nd L), brought to New York by the nonprofit organization Kind Deeds, receive prosthetics at an orthopedic clinic in the city of Brooklyn, New York , United States on October 27, 2022.

Eren Abdullahogullari | Anadolu Agency | Getty Images

— Eren Abdullahogullari | Anadolu Agency | Getty Images

Russia kept interest rates unchanged, ending months of cuts

MOSCOW, Russia: The Russian central bank cut its key interest rate by 300 basis points for the third time since its emergency hike in late February, citing cooling inflation and a recovering ruble.

KIRILL Kudryavtsev | AFP | Getty Images

Russia’s central bank kept its interest rate unchanged at 7.5%, citing inflationary expectations and geopolitical uncertainty following the “partial mobilization” of Russian troops in Ukraine and prospects for a long conflict.

The move to hold the interest rate ended a cycle of several months of cutting that began in April. The central bank more than doubled rates to 20% shortly after Russia invaded Ukraine to counter a falling ruble.

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The central bank has cut rates six times since then, hitting a pre-war interest rate of 9.5% in June, citing improvements in financial conditions and lower inflation. While inflation is still far from the bank’s target of 4%, sitting at 13.7% in September, it has fallen sharply from the 20-year high of 20.37% it hit in April as Western sanctions and the foreign exchange is frozen.

The decision to hold rates at 7.5% was expected by most analysts interviewed by Reuters, the news agency reported.

— Natasha Turak

The US has rejected Russia’s claim that it is helping Ukraine develop a bioweapon

The US has rejected Russian accusations that the Pentagon is helping Ukraine develop banned bioweapons, dismissing them as lies.

The claims are “pure fabrications put out without a shred of evidence,” said US Ambassador to the United Nations Linda Thomas-Greenfield, arguing that Russia was trying to “disrupt the atrocities” being committed in Ukraine.

“Ukraine does not have a biological weapons program. The United States does not have a biological weapons program. There are no Ukrainian biological weapons laboratories supported by the United States,” Thomas-Greenfield said.

Russia’s ambassador to the UN said Moscow would launch an investigation into what he described as US and Ukrainian violations of the weapons convention.

— Natasha Turak

Biden questions Putin’s statement that he has ‘no intention’ to use nuclear weapons

US President Joe Biden has expressed skepticism over Russian President Vladimir Putin’s claims in a recent speech that he has no need or intention to use nuclear weapons in Ukraine.

Sarah Silbiger | Reuters

US President Joe Biden has expressed skepticism over Russian President Vladimir Putin’s claims in a recent speech that he has no need or intention to use nuclear weapons in Ukraine.

“If he has no intention, why is he talking about it? Why is he talking about the ability to use a tactical nuclear weapon?” Biden said in an interview with NewsNation. “He was very dangerous in how he approached it.”

Putin, in a speech on Thursday, played down the possibility of a nuclear conflict and denied that Russia has threatened to use nuclear weapons. He said Moscow was only responding to “nuclear blackmail” from the West.

In previous weeks, however, Putin and other high-level Kremlin officials have expressed Russia’s readiness to use all means at their disposal, including nuclear weapons, to protect Russia’s territorial integrity , which is understood to include the illegally annexed territories of Ukraine.

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— Natasha Turak

Putin said there is ‘no need’ and ‘no point’ in using nuclear weapons in Ukraine

Russian President Vladimir Putin has previously vowed to use “all means available to protect Russia,” which observers have taken to mean nuclear weapons, but the president said in his latest statement that just a response to what he called “nuclear blackmail” by the West. leaders.

Sergei Karpukhin | Sputnik | Reuters

Russian President Vladimir Putin has poured cold water on claims that Russia will deploy nuclear weapons to Ukraine, despite repeatedly citing its ability to use such weapons if the ” territorial integrity” of Russia is threatened.

“We see that there is no need for that,” Putin said on Thursday, speaking at a conference of foreign policy experts. “There is no point in that, neither political, nor military.”

Putin has previously vowed to use “all means available to protect Russia,” which observers have taken to mean nuclear weapons, but the president said in his latest remarks that that was only a response to what he called ” nuclear blackmail” by Western leaders.

He made specific reference to former UK Prime Minister Liz Truss’s comments in August that she would be willing to use nuclear weapons as a leader.

— Natasha Turak

Russia likely to use ‘mobilised reservists’ to bolster its units west of Dnipro river, UK says

Russia is likely to use mobilized reservists to reinforce its units west of Ukraine’s Dnipro river, but troop numbers there are already very low, Britain’s Ministry of Defense said in its latest intelligence update on Twitter .

“In September 2022, Russian officials described the companies in the Kherson sector as consisting of six and eight men each. The companies should deploy with around 100 personnel,” the ministry tweeted.

“In the last six weeks there has been a clear transition from Russian ground forces to move into a long-term, defensive posture in most areas of the front line in Ukraine,” the ministry said.

“This is likely due to a more realistic assessment that the severely undermanned, poorly trained forces in Ukraine are currently only capable of defensive operations.”

It continued, “Even if Russia succeeds in consolidating long-term defense lines in Ukraine, its operational design will remain weak.”

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— Natasha Turak

IAEA inspectors to arrive soon to inspect facilities in Ukraine following Russian ‘dirty bomb’ allegations

International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Director-General Rafael Mariano Grossi during his briefing in Kyiv, Ukraine, October 13, 2022 (Photo by Maxym Marusenko/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

Nurphoto | Nurphoto | Getty Images

IAEA director general Rafael Mariano Grossi said its inspectors would arrive in Ukraine this week following Russian allegations that Kyiv was preparing to use a “dirty bomb.”

“I am very grateful for the openness that the Ukrainian government and I had a comprehensive discussion with the Ukrainian foreign minister Kuleba about this. He came to the conclusion and I agree that the best way to eliminate any doubt is to allow inspectors in and this is what we will do,” Grossi told reporters at the United Nations.

Grossi added that it will likely take only a few days to conduct the inspections.

The US and its allies have dismissed Russian allegations that Ukraine is building ‘dirty bombs.’

— Amanda Macias

‘This meeting is a waste of everyone’s time,’ US Ambassador to UN denounces Russian disinformation attempts

The new US Ambassador to the United Nations, Linda Thomas-Greenfield speaks after meeting with UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres at the United Nations on February 25, 2021 in New York City.

Angela Weiss | AFP | Getty Images

US Ambassador to the United Nations Linda Thomas-Greenfield told her colleagues ahead of the UN Security Council meeting that she would keep her remarks brief because “frankly, this meeting is a waste of time everyone.”

“Russia has called us here, once again, for the sole purpose of spreading disinformation. We all know these claims are pure fabrications, put forth without the slightest evidence,” Thomas said. -Greenfield referring to Moscow’s recent claim that Kyiv has biological weapons.

“We hear Russia raising alarms that biological weapons will be delivered by birds and bats and now even mosquitoes. Birds and bats,” he said, calling Russia’s allegations “absurd. “

“Russia’s claims are absurd for many reasons, including because such species, even if they can be weaponized, pose as much of a threat to the European continent and to Ukraine itself as they do to any other country,” said Thomas-Greenfield.

— Amanda Macias

Read CNBC’s previous live coverage here:

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